Aglitegli

aglitegli

These are small yellow mushrooms frequently used in the tomato sauce for spaghetti. In dialect we call them “Aglitegli” . I found these two babies under a chestnut tree today!

Drumstick mushrooms

drumstick-mushroomToday, after many years (more than 10 I’d say) from the last time I found some of these, I happily found this bunch of cool drumstick mushrooms! This type of mushroom is very big, and you put it in a glass with water overnight, so it opens up. When the hat is open, it can be fried and eaten. My grandpa suggested, once cooked, to put it between two slices of bread and eat it like a sandwich. Mushburger!

Gipsies fishing in the trash

old videos – da caricare

I see this scenario more and more often, at least in Rome and Barcelona (the cities where I spend most of my time): gipsy men and women arrive at the trash bins in the street with their little chariots, and start fishing for something. This is a video of the bins in my street. The traffic is impressive: in a single morning, if you stay few hours at the window, you’ll see 9-10 different people coming at intervals, dive in the trash without caring at all about the smell or the dirt (some of them literally put their entire upper body inside the bin, you only see they butt and legs). And they search. Often they have a hook to grab the stuff. Now the question I haven’t had answered so far is: what the heck do they search for? I don’t think they go for food. I saw them grabbing pieces of solid stuff. Like metal bars. Plastic panels. Little furniture. Someone suggested me that they resell that stuff. But really, is there such a market for those things, a market that justifies this huge traffic of people coming back and forth to browse the trash? It looks also like it’s a competitive market, since they do very frequent trips, like if they want to grab something as soon as it’s trown away, before someone else gets it.